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Photography Questions


#1

Didn’t see a question for this yet, I was messing around with my camera (fujifilm finepix s3100) I wanted to know what it means by frames, it’s under quality and it has 4 different catagories which are 89,133,180, and 653, also 4M,2M,1M,0.3M in that order, I’d also want this topic to start a conversation about photography and how to take dslr quality photos without said dslr. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_B8pVoANyY&index=1&list=PLgYEU1QvJOL_Mh35EEuIoPfKD4IBPgAtx https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7fOzrRqsPc&index=2&list=PLgYEU1QvJOL_Mh35EEuIoPfKD4IBPgAtx


#2

Trying to wrap my head around what these numbers are referring to… Can you post more details?

This is in reference to the “megapixel” count, bigger will give you more resolution in your photos but consequently take up more space. In general, go with the biggest number. You’re pretty limited as is though, 4 megapixels is not much for nowadays but okay for generic online sharing.

It is all in the glass and the sensor, not a lot matters beyond that. You won’t get creative freedom or quality that removable lenses can provide, but you can still get some decent photos out of point-and-shoots/all-in-ones.


#3

‘Frames’ generally refers to ‘fps’ (frames-per-second), like Hutch I’m not sure what those other figures you’ve mentioned are (are these figures referring to the camera’s kelvin reading?)

You can utilise many of the smaller 12 megapixel compact cameras (point & shoot) to capture quality images, and a surprising amount of outstanding photographs are taken on digital compact cameras.

Like anything in photography, ‘composition’ (composing or framing a shot) is everything (especially utilising the ‘Rule Of Thirds’), and being aware of the available light on your subject.


#4

The video with Logan, and Qain that you’ve linked in your post is an excellent video for people wanting to understand what the camera’s ISO does.


#5

This is the screen that has the frames and the numbers, thanks for replying.


#6

Ah, thats how many shots you can take with the SD card you have in there. :slight_smile:


#7

ok thanks


#8

The less megapixels (i.e 0.3M = 653) the more ‘frames’ or pictures you can store on the SD card.


#9

thanks


#10

If you are desiring to improve your photo-skills (composition) then this video may assist you.